Clean Christian Fiction Makes Sense

Clean Christian Fiction Makes Sense

It used to be that Christian readers could pick up a book (fiction or nonfiction) from most recognized “Christian” publishers and never think twice about coming across questionable or outright offensive content or language. This, unfortunately, is no longer the case, folks. And that’s why I sometimes like to remind readers and publishers of where I stand on the issue. As the years pass, I’m afraid it will only become more necessary to do so. Lest anyone question the accuracy of my claim about slipping standards, let me offer two examples to illustrate my point. In a desire to be kind and fair, I won’t mention the authors, book titles, or publishers. The first example is very recent. A recognized author of Christian nonfiction had a 99-cent Kindle sale of one of his books from one of the leading Christian publishers. I had heard good things about this author’s writings and…

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What Novelists Can Learn from a Coffeemaker

About a month ago, our wonderful, faithful Gevalia coffeepot died. What a shame! Since my wife and I have become rather . . . um, dependent on our daily intake of the coffee bean (hey, it is in the vegetable or fruit family), I zipped out to Walmart for another coffeepot. I figured Mr. Coffee was a decent brand, and the model I grabbed was the right price. What a mistake! Two weeks later, I turned it on one morning between pages of a hectic edits—and nada. There wasn’t a sign of life other than a taunting green light that smirked at me as if some wise guy were playing a joke. Thankfully, Walmart took the coffeepot back, and I decided not to waste a nickel on another Mr. Coffee that might just croak again in two weeks. So this time we’re trying a Black & Decker for the same…

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What Can We Learn from The Hunger Games? Part 2

See Part 1. This novel made me think. A lot. What if my name were drawn in an annual death lottery and I was released into an arena where twenty-three other people wanted me dead? What would I do? What would you do? Would you try to kill them before they killed you? Would you fold your arms across your chest and refuse to play in the Games (and very quickly be killed)? Or would you—like little Rue—run, hide, and simply try to stay alive? Anyone who gives this chilling dilemma serious consideration can’t help but sympathize with Katniss in her plight. Yes, The Hunger Games offers a very dark and disturbing premise most of us would rather not consider. And the premise is even more disturbing because teens—in some cases, children—are the ones doing the killing. But all things considered, The Hunger Games is a story about war, except kids are the ones…

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